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Critical Skills for Writing Better Requirements eLearning


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Self-Paced Online:
$595.00
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This course can be tailored to your needs for private, onsite delivery at your location.

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Professional Credits

IIBA (CDU)

ASPE is an IIBA Endorsed Education Provider of business analysis training. Select Project Delivery courses offer IIBA continuing development units (CDU) in accordance with IIBA standards.

PMI (PDU)

Select courses offer Leadership (PDU-L), Strategic (PDU-S) and Technical PMI professional development units that vary according to certification. Technical PDUs are available in the following types: ACP, PBA, PfMP, PMP/PgMP, RMP, and SP.

This course offers:
    7.00 PMP/PgMP Technical PDUs

7
PMI PDUs
Certification
Overview

Our failure to understand users’ requirements is the most common source of project defects, delays and cancellations. The accumulating evidence is unequivocal: most serious problems associated with projects are related directly to requirements. Critical Skills for Writing Better Requirements attacks the problem of project failures by addressing their root causes: incomplete, poorly defined, and/or changing requirements.

This eLearning course will teach you the latest proven techniques for gathering requirements. You’ll gain a thorough understanding of the challenges faced in defining correct requirements, practical approaches for eliciting and documenting requirements, and strategies for managing requirements throughout the project life cycle. If you participate in defining project scope, capturing requirements, or managing project scope, you can’t afford to miss this course!

To view the live version of this Critical Skills for Writing Better Requirements course, click here.

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Course Outline

Module 1: The Business Case for Good Requirements

  1. The IIBA
  2. Business Analysis Body of Knowledge
  3. What is a Requirement?
  4. Project vs. Product Requirements
  5. Characteristics of Effective Requirements
  6. Knowledge Check Quiz

Module 2: The Business Case for Good Requirements, continued

  1. Activity Analyze Five Different Requirements
    • What Changes Would You Make to Make the Requirement More Clear?
    • What Changes Would You Make to Make the Requirement More Concise?
    • What Changes Would You Make to Make the Requirement Less Ambiguous?
  2. Knowledge Check Quiz

Module 3: The Business Case for Good Requirements, continued

  1. Requirement Risks
  2. The cost of Requirement Errors
  3. Requirements Engineering
    • Knowledge Check Quiz

Module 4: Foundations of Requirements Development

  1. What is a System?
  2. What is a Stakeholder?
  3. What is an Actor?
  4. Knowledge Check Quiz

Module 5: Foundations of Requirements Development, continued

  1. Strategy for Analyzing Systems
  2. Common Classification Schemes
  3. Levels of Requirements
  4. Types of Requirements
  5. Activity Match the Requirement
  6. Knowledge Check Quiz

Module 6: Foundations of Requirements Development, continued

  1. Types of Business Rules
  2. Traceability
    • Traceability Links
    • Documenting Trace Relationships
  3. Knowledge Check Quiz

Module 7:  Foundations of Requirements Development, continued

  1. A Closer Look at BABOK Knowledge Areas
    • Enterprise Analysis
      • Business Environment
      • Business Context
    • Activity Case Study
    • Knowledge Check Quiz

Module 8:  Project Initiation, High-level and Mid-level Requirements

  1. A Closer Look at BABOK Knowledge Areas
    • Enterprise Analysis
    • Elicitation
    • Requirements Analysis
  2. Activity  Modeling the Business
  3. Knowledge Check Quiz

Module 9:  Project Initiation, High-level and Mid-level Requirements, continued

  1. Decomposition of a System
    • High-level View
  2. Activity: Create a Context Diagram
  3. Decomposition of a System
    • Mid-level View
  4. Activity: Create an Activity Diagram
  5. Knowledge Check Quiz

Module 10:  Project Initiation, High-level and Mid-level Requirements, continued

  1. Finding Data Requirements
    • CRUD
    • CRUD Matrix
  2. Business Objects
  3. Knowledge Check Quiz

Module 11:  Project Initiation, High-level and Mid-level Requirements, continued

  1. Business Rules
  2. Quality Attributes
    • Attributes Important to Users
    • Attributes Important to Developers
  3. Knowledge Check Quiz

Module 12:  Eliciting Detailed Requirements

  1. Low-level Views
    • Decomposing to Low-level View
      • Process Flowchart
      • Data Flow Diagram
      • Swim Lanes
    • Activity Process Modeling
    • Knowledge Check Quiz

Module 13:  Eliciting Detailed Requirements, continued

  1. Interviewing
    • Best Practices
      • Preparing for Interview
      • Conducting the Interview
      • Documenting the Interview
    • Knowledge Check Quiz

Module 14:  Uses Cases, a First Look

  1. What is a Use Case?
  2. Use Case Anatomy
  3. Use Case Courses (Scenarios)
  4. Developing a Use Case
  5. Use Case Traps to Avoid
  6. Activity Write a Use Case
  7. Knowledge Check Quiz

Module 15: Reviewing and Refining Requirements

  1. Elements of Requirements Style
    • System Perspective
    • User Perspective
  2. Sources of Ambiguity
  3. Guidelines to Avoid Ambiguity
  4. Samples of Project and Product Requirements
  5. Knowledge Check Quiz

Module 16: Packaging and Presenting Requirements

  1. Organizing Requirements
  2. Package the Requirements
  3. Knowledge Check Quiz
Who should attend

This writing business requirements training course is valuable for all those involved in managing and defining projects.

This eLearning is for you if you are a:

  • Business Customer or Partner who wants to work more effectively with IT colleagues to identify project requirements for solving business problems
  • Business Analyst who needs to define or gather users' business requirements
  • Business Systems Analyst who wants to understand user's business requirements, translate them into clear statements of functional and system requirements and add value to IT projects
  • Systems Analyst who must develop correct technical specifications from functional and system requirements
  • Designer or Developer who desires to produce a high-quality system from the functional and systems requirements
  • Project Manager or Team Leader who must ensure that IT project team members correctly understand customer needs and deliver high quality solutions within project constraints.
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